CHEMICALS, FRACKING & FRESH GROUNDWATER (and bears!)

FRACKING & CHEMICAL USE

 

Chemicals serve many functions in hydraulic fracturing. From limiting the growth of bacteria to preventing corrosion of the well casing, chemicals are needed to insure that the fracturing job is effective and efficient.

The number of chemical additives used in a typical fracture treatment depends on the conditions of the specific well-being fractured. A typical fracture treatment will use very low concentrations of between 3 and 12 additive chemicals, depending on the characteristics of the water and the shale formation being fractured. Each component serves a specific, engineered purpose. For example, the predominant fluids currently being used for fracture treatments in the gas shale plays are water‐based fracturing fluids mixed with friction‐reducing additives (called slickwater).  The addition of friction reducers allows fracturing fluids and sand, or other solid materials called proppants, to be pumped to the target zone at a higher rate and reduced pressure than if water alone were used. In addition to friction reducers, other additives include: biocides to prevent microorganism growth and to reduce biofouling of the fractures; oxygen scavengers and other stabilizers to prevent corrosion of metal pipes; and acids that are used to remove drilling mud damage within the near‐wellbore area. These fluids are used  to create the fractures in the formation and to carry a propping agent (typically silica sand) which is deposited in the induced fractures to keep them from closing up. The chart below taken from Modern Shale Gas Development in the United States: A Primer demonstrates the volumetric percentages of additives that were used for a nine‐stage hydraulic fracturing treatment of a Fayetteville Shale horizontal well. The make‐up of fracturing fluid varies from one geologic basin or formation to another. Evaluating the relative volumes of the components of a fracturing fluid reveals the relatively small volume of additives that are present. The additives depicted on the right side of the pie chart represent less than 0.5% of the total fluid volume. Overall the concentration of additives in most slickwater fracturing fluids is a relatively consistent 0.5% to 2% with water making up 98% to 99.5%. Because the make‐up of each fracturing fluid varies to meet the specific needs of each area, there is no one‐size‐fits‐all formula for the volumes for each additive. In classifying fracturing fluids and their additives it is important to realize that service companies that provide these additives have developed a number of compounds with similar functional properties to be used for the same purpose in different well environments. The difference between additive formulations may be as small as a change in concentration of a specific compound. Although the hydraulic fracturing industry may have a number of compounds that can be used in a hydraulic fracturing fluid, any single fracturing job would only use a few of the available additives. For example, the chart shown below, represents 12 additives used, covering the range of possible functions that could be built into a fracturing fluid.

Intellect Is Clearly Through The Roof Here

I’m baffled by this kind of brilliance


really? No Fracking way? cute.
WOULD YOU PUT A FLAME TO THIS WATER?
WOULD YOU LEASE YOUR ENTIRE BACKYARD OUT TO AN OIL & GAS COMPANY ON A GAMBLE?
WILL WE EVER UTILIZE OUR DOMESTIC minerals & RESOURCES – STOP GIVING BILLIONS to the middle-east for oil?!

UNREAL.
“if Kuwait grew carrots, we wouldn’t give a damn.”

 i wonder which oil & gas genius/geologist came up with this ad & the cute little tag that is now being repeated & echoed by thousands of parrots.

I think we’ve had enough silly protests. Please write a letter not a picket-sign… vote, maybe?

America needs to save & redeem itself – not fight with each other & elected officials with aimless yelling & hot pink picket-signs pointed at logical economic decisions
POINTED LITTLE PICKET SIGNS POKING at the very people we (the majority, at least) voted into office.  

PUT THEM DOWN, PLEASE.
OTHER OPTIONS: WALL PAPER Or ON YOUR FRONT YARD.

So, can hydraulic fracturing fluid migrate into a fresh groundwater zone?

The answer is: YES. 


Fracturing fluids can enter a fresh groundwater zone if there is sufficient bottom hole pressure to raise the fluid level from the fractured zone to the fresh groundwater zone, and there is a conduit through which the fluid can flow such as an open annulus between the casing and the formation.  They may also enter fresh groundwater if there is a hole in the casing above the depth of the groundwater zone and the cement outside of the casing is not adequate to prevent fluid flow between the casing and the formation.  Under normal circumstances hydraulic fracturing fluid is confined to the inside of the production casing, the formation being treated and nearby formations. 

THIS IS WHERE SCIENCE AND AN ADAGE SOMEONE TITLED “DARCY’S LAW COMES IN.

(IT’S MUCH MORE APPEALING THAN MURPHY’S LAW, IF YOU WERE WONDERING.) 

“When calculating the possibility of contaminant flow from a hydraulically fractured zone to a fresh water aquifer, the application of Darcy’s law is critical because it sets out the specific conditions under which fluid could flow from one zone to another and will ultimately determine whether or not fluids can migrate from the hydraulically fractured zone to the fresh water aquifer.” 


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